Submit Manuscript  

Article Details


Association of newly diagnosed hypertension and polypharmacy with frailty in tertiary hospital patients from Maracaibo city, Venezuela.

Author(s):

Juan Salazar*, Isabel Borges*, Alejandra Rivas-Motenegro, Nelson Villasmil-Hernandez, Manuel Nava and Roberto Añez  

Abstract:


Background: As a syndrome of physiological vulnerability and multifactorial progressive decline tightly related to age, frailty has been associated with several illnesses, and in particular cardiovascular disease.

Objective: To assess the factors associated with the frailty syndrome in older adults evaluated in the outpatient clinic of a tertiary hospital from Maracaibo city, Venezuela.

Materials and Methods: An observational, analytical, cross-sectional study was performed on subjects of both genders, over 60 years old, that went to the Internal Medicine outpatient clinic of the Hospital General del Sur "Dr. Pedro Iturbe" from Maracaibo city, Venezuela. Sampling was performed via a non-probabilistic, intentional method. For each subject with frailty or pre-frailty, a control subject was selected in a 1:1 ratio according to gender; several risk factors were interrogated. The state of frailty was determined through the FRAIL scale.

Results: Of the 201 assessed patients, 49.3% (n=99) were non-frail, 19.9% (n=40) were pre-frail and 30.8% (n=62) were frail. The population's overall age was 68.8±6.8 in non-frails, 69.1±7.7 in pre-frails, and 68.6±7.1 in frails. In the multivariate analysis, subjects with frailty and pre-frailty were most likely to be receiving polypharmacy (OR: 2.36, CI95%: 1.05-5.37; P=0.04) and have hypertension during the study (OR: 10.19, CI95%: 3.86-26.89; P<0.01).

Conclusion: The newly diagnosed hypertension and presence of polypharmacy were the factors most associated with frailty and pre-frailty in older adults evaluated in a tertiary hospital from Maracaibo city, Venezuela.

Keywords:

Frailty, elderly, hypertension, severity, polypharmacy, pre-frailty

Affiliation:

Servicio de Medicina Interna. Hospital General del Sur “Dr. Pedro Iturbe”. Maracaibo, Servicio de Medicina Interna. Hospital General del Sur “Dr. Pedro Iturbe”. Maracaibo, Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition. Gregorio Marañón General University Hospital, Madrid, Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center. School of Medicine. University of Zulia. Maracaibo, Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Research Center. School of Medicine. University of Zulia. Maracaibo, Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition. Gregorio Marañón General University Hospital, Madrid



Full Text Inquiry